Headaches: There are several reports of brainwave entrainment providing therapeutic benefit for those suffering from general headaches or migraines. A study in 1985 analyzed photic stimulation within the theta range (5 Hz to 8 Hz) and discovered that this protocol provided significant headache relief. A total of 19/24 participants noted that the “slow wave” photic stimulation provided “complete relief” from chronic headaches and migraines.
Stress: In one randomized controlled trial with 108 participants, a single session of alpha and delta stimulation resulted in significantly less anxiety in surgical patients. Another session of theta stimulation resulted in improvement in certain measures of stress. Stimulation with certain frequencies of alpha and beta were reported to provide the most significant benefit for those who are stressed.
No list is complete without exercise. Throughout our lives, exercise is critical for helping us maintain healthy bones, a trim figure, and balanced hormones. During menopause, many women gain weight. This is attributed to fluctuating hormones causing food cravings, fatigue causing less activity, and the body not adapting to the hormones and new lifestyle patterns.
Over the past few years, brainwave entrainment products have made a great rise in popularity, reaching more people than ever before and peaking their interest with the many benefits ensured. We now have a continually expanding pool of options to choose from, as well as more information and scientific research on the subject than in the past.  Brainwave Entrainment audios, and the products being made with this technology are literally changing the game in the personal development field, and have become one of the largest catalysts in our recent evolution as a human race.  In fact, these audios may be one of the main contributing factors in unlocking the potential to tap into the untouched 98% of our brains that we are currently not using.
You’ve heard the “om” sound yogis make when they meditate, right? Well, Joshi says using a buzzing sound is another way to use your voice to calm yourself in the midst of a freakout. “Bhramari, a humming bee sound, can be done by closing the eyes and making the humming sound like a bee,” she says. “These sound vibrations calm down the thought waves and relax the entire nervous system. External sound frequency resonates with the internal rhythm of the body and mind, creating peace and tranquility within.” Research from India has shown Bhramari to improve cardiovascular patterns. Press your ears closed for an even stronger vibration.
Theta brainwaves are next highest in frequency above delta and are especially important for many people using brainwave entrainment and meditation because theta waves are at a threshold, forming a link between wakefulness and the subconscious mind. Theta waves bridge between our awake self and the creative and insightful understandings from below our conscious awareness, and while they are not common in awake adults, they are normative for children under 13 years old. 
A large dose of caffeine causes a short-term spike in blood pressure. It may also cause your hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to go into overdrive. Instead of coffee or energy drinks, try green tea. It has less than half the caffeine of coffee and contains healthy antioxidants, as well as theanine, an amino acid that has a calming effect on the nervous system.

In a recent national survey, 44 percent of adults said stress had caused sleepless nights at least once in the previous month. All that tossing, turning and staring at the ceiling can leave you feeling tired and more stressed the next day. If you’re caught in this vicious cycle of anxiety and insomnia, there’s good news: Simple stress relief techniques can help you sleep better and feel calmer.


We all deal with stress every day, and every day our bodies strive to adapt and stay balanced and healthy. In Adaptogens, authors David Winston and Steven Maimes provide a comprehensive look into adaptogens, non-toxic herbs such as ginseng, eleuthero, and licorice, that produce a defensive response to stress in our bodies. Formerly known as rejuvenating herbs or tonics, adaptogens help the body to “adapt” to the many influences it encounters. They increase stamina and counter the normal effects of aging and thus are becoming important tools in sports medicine and in the prevention and treatment of chronic fatigue and other stress-related disorders. 

Exercise can be an effective component of a stress management program for many individuals and should be recommended to help those who are dealing with acute, acute episodic, or chronic stress. An advantage of incorporating exercise into a stress management program compared with other stress management techniques is the well-documented physical and psychological health benefits of exercise. However, it is important to remember that exercise is only one component of a stress management program, and there might be situations that require assistance beyond the expertise of a fitness professional, especially in working with individuals who are experiencing acute episodic or chronic stress. Although exercise might be effective in helping an individual feel calmer who is dealing with these types of stress, it will not solve the problem of major chronic or regular stressors. It may be necessary to refer these individuals to resources who can help them to address their stressors, such as a psychologist or other health care providers.
After a few more trips I decided to get brave & try something new. Being a bit of a color genius, he recommended departing from the blonde life to try being a redhead -- the very color that had done me wrong so many times before. But having experienced his work firsthand, I put my hair in his hands as I listened to him shouting color codes to his assistant and then once again, away he went for bowls of magic (insert major deep-breath moment). The results were nothing short of incredible. Not only was color beautiful, it complemented my skin tone & eye color as if it was always supposed to be that way.
If you're already a carb lover, it's likely that nothing can come between you and a doughnut when stress hits. First rule of thumb: Don't completely deny the craving. According to MIT research, carbohydrates can help the brain make serotonin, the same substance regulated by antidepressants. But instead of reaching for that sugary bear claw, go for complex carbs. "Stress can cause your blood sugar to rise, Mangieri says, "so a complex carb like oatmeal won't contribute to your already potential spike in blood glucose."
To use your senses to quickly relieve stress, you first need to identify the sensory experiences that work best for you. This can require some experimentation. As you employ different senses, note how quickly your stress levels drop. And be as precise as possible. What is the specific kind of sound or type of movement that affects you the most? For example, if you’re a music lover, listen to many different artists and types of music until you find the song that instantly lifts and relaxes you.
It has been both a pleasure and an enlightening experience listening to the Equisync II CDs for the past month. As a 15 year stroke survivor, daily meditation has become a part of my life. Listening to these CDs reminds me of sitting alone in a forest during periods of rain, whether they be light, heavy, or in between. I am able to access my right hemisphere more readily and experience the feeling of nirvana that we all have within us. When I reach this point, my system reminds itself of all the compassion and connectedness we each have.
Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 first group it increases, and for the second decreases. Experimental group did not fall asleep but maintained a relaxation state after the stimulus, while control group achieved unconscious relaxation but the effects did not hold. The STAI “State” indicated that stress increased after the stimulus for control group (see graph A1.2). 14. CONCLUSIONS • Delta (20-200) and theta (20-100) brainwaves are the ones that have greater amplitude (microvolts) in both groups. Results are clearly shown in graphs A1.5 and A1.10. Graph A1.5 Theta Graph A1.10 Delta • Higher frequency EEG waves such as beta waves have less amplitude. This happens because they are not synchronized and have more phase differences in both groups. • An increased alpha parameter is higher in the experimental group, which indicates that they achieved conscious relaxation. In contrast, the control group showed higher delta waves and presented signs of deep sleep during the experiment. Control group also possibly reached REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep halfway throughout the stimulus due theta waves presence in the EEG. • Beta waves are higher in the control group from s = 507 to s = 624 because of unexpected sounds in the stimulus (traffic noise appeared in the original recording). • Both stimuli induced relaxation, but it is important to point out that a person can relax without falling asleep. In this way the binaural stimulus worked better. • It is likely that the control group fell asleep with the nature sounds stimuli because lack of stimulation. • Contrary to what we expected, theta binaural waves didn’t induced FFR in experimental group, although they helped to achieve conscious relaxation. • Delta waves were higher in the experimental group during post-experiment measurements. This suggests that relaxation states were maintained with the absence of stimulus. • Presence of Alpha waves was reduced during deep sleep. This evidence is supported by the control group’s Delta values. • In the absence of stimuli, Delta wave values of the control group decreased, which means that relaxation effects did not prevail. • The effectiveness of an anxiolytic may be measured through the relaxation degree during stimulus and whether its effect endured or not. • For further evaluation of coherence [17] between brainwaves in both hemispheres and the ERP, the use of a 10-20 EEG system is recommended. • Post-experimental STAI “State” tests results are lower in the experimental group. This means that Theta binaural waves were a better anxiolytic than the stimuli (nature sounds) used in the control group. REFERENCES [1] Huang, T., & Charyton, C. (2008). A Comprehensive Review of The Psychological Effects of Brainwave Entrainment. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 14(5). [2] Berger H. (1929) Über Das Elektrenkephalogramm Des Menschen. Arch Psychiatrie Nervenkrankheiten. [3] Chatrian GE, Petersen MC, Lazarte JA. (1960) Responses to clicks from the human brain: some depth electrographic observations. Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol.. [4] Ulam, Frederick A. (1991) An Investigation of the effects of binaural beat frequencies on human brain waves. California School Of Professional Psychology. [5] Notimex. (2013, July 02). México, país con más estrés laboral. El Universal. Retrieved from: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/ciencia/2013/mexico-pais-mas-estres-laboral-78744.html [6] American Psychological Association (n.d.). Stress: The different kinds of stress. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-kinds.aspx [7] R. Padmanabhan, A. J. Hildreth and D. Laws. (2005) A prospective, randomised, experimentalled study examining binaural beat audio and pre-operative anxiety in patients undergoing general anaesthesia for day case surgery. Anaesthesia. 60, 769-773. [8] Loy, Gareth. (2006) Musimathics. London, England: MIT Press. [9] Atwater, F. Holmes. (2009) Frequency Following Response Study. The Monroe Institute. [10] Ferraro, Fernando M., Acuña, Marcelo. (n.d.) Formación Reticular y Fibras de Asociación del Experimental Encefálico. Departamento de anatomia facultad de medicina, UBA. [11]Le Scouarnec, R. P., Poirier, R. M. Owens, J. E., Gauthier, J., Taylor, A. G. and Foresman, P. A. (2001) Use of Binaural beat tapes for treatment on anxiety: a pilot study of tape preference and outcomes. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. [12] Díaz, M. A., & Comeche, M. I. (2004). Beneficios de la relajación. Retrived from: http://www.psicologiadelasalud.es/beneficios_de_la_relajacion.html [13] Gómez García, J. (2003). Efectos de la música trance percusiva y la música trance electrónica en el EEG. Tesis Licenciatura. Psicología. Departamento de Psicología, Escuela de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de las Américas Puebla. Retrieved from:
Joseph Kao, creator of Journey to the Center of the Self, a deep, 30-minute, guided transpersonal meditation, accompanied by music embedded with advanced brainwave entrainment technology and followed by 30 minutes of only the brainwave entrainment music, talks with iAwake’s CEO, John Dupuy, about all that went into the making of this meditation tool masterpiece. Transcending and Including the Little Self John:           One thing I find so remarkable about your guided meditation in Journey to … [Read more...]
Yoga, an excellent stress-relief exercise, involves a series of moving and stationary poses, or postures, combined with deep breathing. A mind-body exercise, yoga can strengthen your body’s natural relaxation response and bring you into a healthy balance. For stress relief, do gentle yoga or yoga for beginners — popular “power yoga” classes may be too intense if your main goal is to ease stress.
One ounce of the buttery nut packs 11% of the daily recommended value of zinc, an essential mineral that may help reduce anxiety. When researchers gave zinc supplements to people who were diagnosed with both anxiety symptoms (irritability, lack of ability to concentrate) and deficient zinc levels over a course of eight weeks, the patients saw a 31% decrease in anxiety, according to Nutrition and Metabolic Insights. This is likely because zinc affects the levels of a nerve chemical that influences mood. If you're already getting enough zinc, then it may not help your mood to chow down on cashews (or other zinc-rich foods like oysters, beef, chicken, and yogurt). But, cashews are also rich in omega-3s and protein, so they're a smart snack no matter what.
First of all I wanna say thank you for the effort you did to make this article! It’s been very helpfull and i’ve learned alot. But I have a question. What is the best state to be in(and HZ to listen to) when meditating? Honestly I’m very new to this and I’ve only gain information about meditation on the internet(thank God for internet!), but I don’t really know where to start and wich state is best. I hope you can help me out a little bit. Thank you!
A high quality theta meditation MP3 specifically designed for restless, unsettled individuals. This Theta meditation, ramping in steps down to 6.5 Hz. It stimulates mid-Theta, so it may be easier to remain conscious during this session than with the deeper Theta meditations. This MP3 also uses a technique called Dissociation which is particularly useful for people who are restless and have trouble relaxing.
An invigorating, brain-sharpening session, this audio starts at 14Hz, a beta feel-good frequency, and SR harmonic. It then steps up in six-minute harmonic increments, gradually up to gamma 39Hz, leaving you feeling mentally stimulated and full of energy. A binaural beat track supports the main frequencies for those wearing headphones. Uplifting background music with embedded amplitude modulation provides a further layer of entrainment. Excellent for use as a morning alarm clock, ahead of a big night out, or to inspire those tired trips to the gym.
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