Binaural beats were the first method discovered for brainwave entrainment and works by delivering tones of different audible frequencies to the two ears with the difference in frequency between the two tones being the frequency of entrainment. The difference in frequency between the two tones must be less than 30 hertz, and this resulting frequency is called a beat or the target frequency, and it is processed in a brain region called the olivary body. When listening to such tones with stereo headphones, the two hemispheres of the brain become synchronized at the target frequency.

Our everyday, waking brain used for active intelligence operates at approximately 13 hertz, which is in the range of high alpha or low beta frequencies. People who have certain learning disabilities and problems with attention often have low levels of 13 hertz frequency brainwaves in crucial areas of the brain used for sequencing tasks and doing simple math calculations. This is one concrete example of how brainwaves are associated with thinking and behavior. Each identified brainwave frequency has a different effect on a person’s ability to think, act, and feel.

To use your senses to quickly relieve stress, you first need to identify the sensory experiences that work best for you. This can require some experimentation. As you employ different senses, note how quickly your stress levels drop. And be as precise as possible. What is the specific kind of sound or type of movement that affects you the most? For example, if you’re a music lover, listen to many different artists and types of music until you find the song that instantly lifts and relaxes you.
Animals are used in research without us fully understanding their consciousness, so why should we worry about creating artificial 3D brain-like structures?  Maybe we shouldn’t. This is something we, both the scientific community and the public, need to work out. A variety of 3D organoids including a colon, small intestine, liver, retinal cells (cells in the eye), and pancreas have been implanted into living organisms, in some cases, to repair and rescue tissue damage (colon, liver, and pancreas). Meaning  that organoids may have potential for cell therapy. Stem cell therapy is  already being tested in a number of clinical trials, and organoids could be the next step. We are not that many steps away from organoids reaching a human brain, therefore, it is worth considering how they  impact the brains of other living creatures.

Placebos do not work on me. Heck, even some low-mid doses of proven, effective medicine do not work. Or work well. Ever since I fell terribly ill in grade school, my brain had fundamentally changed. Before, I could comprehend anything. Tell me, show me and I understood it – no matter how advanced it was. I was in the top 98th percentile in the nation. BUT, you never know what you have until it is gone!
Dealing with sudden stress—a phone call with bad news, a last-minute assignment from your boss, or an argument with your spouse—triggers a cascade of physical and mental symptoms that can be hard to stop. The first thing to do? Pay attention to your breathing pattern, and make an effort to start taking slow, deep breaths as stress relievers. “Breathing can change how we feel because emotions and breathing are closely connected,” says Emma Seppala, PhD, author of The Happiness Track and a Stanford University psychologist who’s done research on yogic breathing. “A revealing research study showed that different emotional states are associated with distinct respiration patterns.” In a follow-up study, participants actually started to feel the emotions that corresponded to an assigned breathing pattern. “This finding is revolutionary: We can change how we feel using our breath!” Dr. Seppala says. Deep breathing gets more oxygen to your brain and may lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol.
Theta stimulation: There appears to be no benefit associated with using theta stimulation for cognitive functioning, mood, or stress relief. While theta may be a useful way to induce sleep or alter your state of consciousness, there really isn’t much science supporting entrainment in this particular range for most purposes. Photic stimulation of theta between 5 Hz and 7 Hz can be useful for headaches.
It has been both a pleasure and an enlightening experience listening to the Equisync II CDs for the past month. As a 15 year stroke survivor, daily meditation has become a part of my life. Listening to these CDs reminds me of sitting alone in a forest during periods of rain, whether they be light, heavy, or in between. I am able to access my right hemisphere more readily and experience the feeling of nirvana that we all have within us. When I reach this point, my system reminds itself of all the compassion and connectedness we each have.
Deemed as the “the most relaxing brainwave”, delta waves are at their most active when you’re not- they appear when you’re asleep and reduce your overall sense of awareness. Associated with the sub-conscious to unconscious parts of the mind, delta brainwaves are said to be the opening to non-physical states of reality. As a result, this brain state is most often seen while one is in very deep meditation or dreamless sleep.
Only 4 of the participants reported no change as a result of the stimulation. Four years later in a study (1989) by Anderson analyzed LED photic stimulation for the treatment of headaches. There were 60 patients included in the study which involved Variable Frequency Photo-stimulation (VFP) with specialized goggles that contained light-emitting diodes.
Judith Pennington shares her extensive knowledge of gamma brain waves with John Dupuy, co-founder of iAwake Technologies. Judith is the founder of the Institute for the Awakened Mind, where practitioners from all over the world use the Mind Mirror EEG to map, monitor, train, and research advanced states of consciousness. Judith:        I fell in love with gamma in 2005. I had started seeing extended amplitudes up in the high beta range, which normally describe states of stress, anxiety, and … [Read more...]

Everyone experiences stress, and not all stress is bad. However, individuals who experience acute episodic and chronic stress are at increased risk for developing stress-related health problems. This article outlines the relationship between stress and health and discusses the role of exercise in managing stress. Exercise recommendations and stress management tips are provided.
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Tracks that move from alpha to theta can be a perfect vehicle for transitioning from a hectic day into a relaxing and rejuvenating sleep. Beginning with alpha waves takes you into a light but still alert meditative mind state where the difficulties of the day can be resolved and put to rest. Later, theta waves go deeper into the unconscious, preparing you for sleep and dreams.
Judith Pennington shares her extensive knowledge of gamma brain waves with John Dupuy, co-founder of iAwake Technologies. Judith is the founder of the Institute for the Awakened Mind, where practitioners from all over the world use the Mind Mirror EEG to map, monitor, train, and research advanced states of consciousness. Judith:        I fell in love with gamma in 2005. I had started seeing extended amplitudes up in the high beta range, which normally describe states of stress, anxiety, and … [Read more...]
An invigorating, brain-sharpening session, this audio starts at 14Hz, a beta feel-good frequency and SR harmonic. It then steps up in six-minute harmonic increments, gradually up to gamma 39Hz, leaving you feeling mentally stimulated and full of energy. A binaural beat track supports the main frequencies for those wearing headphones. Uplifting background music with embedded amplitude modulation provides a further layer of entrainment. Excellent for use as a morning alarm clock, ahead of a big night out, or to inspire those tired trips to the gym.
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