Fortunately, the recommendations for exercise in the role of stress management fit with the current health recommendations (12). The proposed physiological adaptations thought to improve the way the body handles stress and recovers from stress can occur with a regular moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise program (12,13,16), such as the recommendations of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise per week or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week. If an individual is using exercise as a time-out from stressors, shorter duration activity can serve the purpose, especially when lack of time or fatigue is a concern. Consider an individual who reports significant work-related stress. Breaking the exercise into two 10- to 15-minute sessions, one before work and one at lunch time when possible, can help combat stress throughout the day. Although there is not a lot of research with resistance exercise and stress management, resistance exercise can be used to provide a time-out from one’s stressors. Because resistance training produces different exercise adaptations compared with aerobic exercise, it might not affect the way the body physiologically reacts to stress as aerobic exercise does. However, the acute effect of a time-out to reduce stress can be beneficial. In addition, clients can receive the numerous health benefits associated with resistance training. The resistance exercise prescription for general health benefits of 2 to 3 days of exercise to target all of the major muscle groups performed at a moderate intensity of 8 to 12 repetitions can be recommended.
While binaural beats are the most common technique we use for producing brainwave entrainment music, we do use other brainwave entrainment techniques such as isochronic tones, monaural beats and amplitude modulation. If these techniques have been used then you will find them mentioned in the written description of the music productions that include them. If not mentioned, then you can assume that binaural beats are the only brainwave entrainment technology in use.
Going deeper now, spiraling downwards, you enter “Into the Vortex.” Imagine now you are standing outside the Pyramids of Egypt and a hot wind is blowing by. Wind can be heard with deep, spatial synthesized drone sounds. This recording actually DOES take you what has been described as the “Pyramid Frequency” the frequency that has been said to resonate outside the great walls of the Pyramids in Egypt. This CD will take you down to even deeper brainwave frequencies than the first CD …. 9.41 Hz to 7.8hz

With digital upgrades, Berger’s machine is still in use today, known as an electroencephalography machine, or EEG. Berger used his machine to study the brains of psychologically normal and abnormal people and discovered the first brainwave, called the alpha wave and also known as the Berger wave, along with the faster beta wave, which he observed suppressing the alpha wave when subjects opened their closed eyes. 


Among the four dominant types of brainwaves, the Theta wave has earned the reputation of perhaps being the “most creative”. The dominant pattern when people are in the dream stages of their sleep, a person with increased Theta brainwaves during waking activity has a very high level of thinking and creativity. With a high amplitude and frequency of 4 Hz to 8 Hz, Theta waves are often dominant in the brain’s right hemisphere, which is also the hemisphere of highly-creative people. Here are some of the benefits you might enjoy with an increased Theta brainwave production:
Anabel debuts in the Emerald chapter. She is one of the seven Trainers hired by Scott to be a Frontier Brain at the Battle Frontier. Anabel is first seen watching the Battle Frontier's opening ceremony. The ceremony is interrupted by Emerald, who announces that he wishes to conquer the Battle Frontier. The press mistakenly report the incident as allowing an ordinary Trainer to take part in the Battle Frontier before it officially opens a week later. The Frontier Brains decide to use this assumption as free publicity and allow Emerald to challenge the Battle Frontier under the condition that he completes it before it officially opens.
If you're already a carb lover, it's likely that nothing can come between you and a doughnut when stress hits. First rule of thumb: Don't completely deny the craving. According to MIT research, carbohydrates can help the brain make serotonin, the same substance regulated by antidepressants. But instead of reaching for that sugary bear claw, go for complex carbs. "Stress can cause your blood sugar to rise, Mangieri says, "so a complex carb like oatmeal won't contribute to your already potential spike in blood glucose."
Calling all chocoholics: a regular healthy indulgence (just a bite, not a whole bar!) of dark chocolate might have the power to regulate your stress levels. "Research has shown that it can reduce your stress hormones, including cortisol," Sass says. "Also, the antioxidants in cocoa trigger the walls of your blood vessels to relax, lowering blood pressure and improving circulation. And finally, dark chocolate contains unique natural substances that create a sense of euphoria similar to the feeling of being in love!" Go for varieties that contain at least 70% cocoa.
A study published in Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology by Paul Williams and Michael West in 1975 examined the brainwave states of people experienced in meditation while using photic stimulation, and another study by Leonard, Telch, and Harrington in 1999 examined the successful use of brainwave entrainment techniques for attaining meditative states in subjects.
Delta brainwaves are produced and associated with states of deep sleep and healing. Stress slips away very easily in this state. Sleep is deep and dreamless. The Delta state has been noted as having a good effect in terms of healing on both the adrenal and limbic systems. Something which in turn has led to it’s perceived positive effect on conditions such as PTSD.
“I have been using them as often as I could over the past week. During this time, I have undertaken editing a book, and plenty of reading, amongst other things. To help, I used the 'Razor Sharp' audio. It was like I was in my own little bubble of concentration. Amazing! I will continue to use this one every time I am working on something at the computer.
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