It is not accurate to call religious fundamentalism a disease, because that term refers to a pathology that physically attacks the biology of a system. But fundamentalist ideologies can be thought of as mental parasites. A parasite does not usually kill the host it inhabits, as it is critically dependent on it for survival. Instead, it feeds off it and changes its behavior in ways that benefit its own existence. By understanding how fundamentalist ideologies function and are represented in the brain using this analogy, we can begin to understand how to inoculate against them, and potentially, how to rehabilitate someone who has undergone ideological brainwashing — in other words, a reduction in one’s ability to think critically or independently.
Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab
Yoga, an excellent stress-relief exercise, involves a series of moving and stationary poses, or postures, combined with deep breathing. A mind-body exercise, yoga can strengthen your body’s natural relaxation response and bring you into a healthy balance. For stress relief, do gentle yoga or yoga for beginners — popular “power yoga” classes may be too intense if your main goal is to ease stress.
Fortified milk is an excellent source of vitamin D, a nutrient that might boost happiness. A 50-year-long study by London's UCL Institute of Child Health found an association between reduced levels of vitamin D and an increased risk of panic and depression among 5,966 men and women. People who had sufficient vitamin D levels had a reduced risk of panic disorders compared to subjects with the lowest levels of vitamin D. Other foods high in vitamin D include salmon, egg yolks, and fortified cereal.
Group exercise or encouraging stressed clients to find a workout partner is an excellent idea because it can provide a support network and accountability. However, there might be clients who find a group setting intimidating or competitive, which could be counterproductive in managing stress. In addition, those who report stress because of work or family obligations might enjoy the solitude of exercising alone. Using a variety of exercises or nontraditional exercises (e.g., exergaming, dance classes, yard work, or rock climbing) is a way to plan activities that are enjoyable to maximize adherence. Knowing your clients’ exercise barriers and stressors will help with planning an exercise program that can address these variables to maximize the benefits for health and stress management.
Biofeedback enhancement: In 1981, researcher Arturo Manns discovered that 15 minutes of stimulation with isochronic tones enhanced biofeedback protocols for bruxism (grinding of teeth). They did this by increasing muscle relaxation superior than standalone biofeedback. Brainwave entrainment is different from biofeedback in that it does not allow the person to consciously control their brainwave state.
These days it doesn't take much to stress people out. Being on edge just from living in the fast paced modern world is often enough to put people precariously close to panic and anxiety attacks, insomnia and bad eating habits. These side effects of stress can combine to cause short and long-term complications if someone doesn't regulate their stress levels. If you are looking for a natural, non-pharmaceutical way to reduce stress, consider brainwave entrainment.

According to a recent study published in the British journal Heart, slow or meditative music is a proven stress buster, so set your dial to a soothing station during your commute. And, if you're stuck in a traffic jam, sneak in this quick exercise: Grab your steering wheel and clench the muscles in your fingers, arms, shoulders and back. Do this until your muscles begin to tremble (about 45 seconds), then release. You'll produce a wave of relief in your upper neck and arms all the way down to your fingers. Just make sure your foot is on the brake when you let go of the wheel! (FYI: pink noise is the newest tool for reducing stress.)

“I'm really enjoying the Brain Salon recordings. I was a huge fan of the BrainEv System and found the technology to be a cut above the competition. I often wished you guys would produce recordings for specific purposes, so I was very excited when I heard about the Brain Salon. I love using the Razor Sharp track, it instantly puts me into 'The Zone,' where I'm totally into whatever I'm doing... and do it incredibly well. I also use the Creativity track a lot when I'm doing something that requires lateral thinking. I'm super-excited that you guys went ahead and used the BrainEv technology to create tracks like these. I'd highly recommend anyone to check out the Brain Salon.”
×