When your mind is all over the place, organizing your thoughts into a quick to-do list can help transfer the burden from your brain to paper. But for some people, seeing a long list of tasks can increase stress. Miller has another idea: a “stressor and action” sheet. “Fold a piece of paper in half length wise, and on the left column write ‘stressor’ and on the right hand column write ‘action,’” she says. “You will find as you write down thoughtful action steps to the things that are stressing you out, you regain authority over circumstance.” These are the signs you’re more stressed than you realize.
The advice “take a deep breath” may seem like a cliché, but it holds true when it comes to stress. For centuries, Buddhist monks have been conscious of deliberate breathing during meditation. For an easy three- to five-minute exercise, sit up in your chair with your feet flat on the floor and hands on top of your knees. Breathe in and out slowly and deeply, concentrating on your lungs as they expand fully in your chest. While shallow breathing causes stress, deep breathing oxygenates your blood, helps center your body, and clears your mind.
I have been listening to relaxing music on YouTube while writing (I write for a court TV show) YouTube recommended Binaural Beats; I thought the sound was annoying at first, and almost moved on from it, but when I felt a tickle in my brain (It sounds funny but I’m being honest!) I decided to research about Binaural Beats and came across this amazing, informative website, it’s only been a few minutes of listening to Binaural Beats and I’m hooked! thank you Zenlama.com
If brainwave entrainment leaves you with unwanted side-effects (see below) or discomfort, you’re probably encouraging a range of brainwaves that are already excessive in some area of your brain. The way around this is to get a brain map to see what your brain’s strengths and weaknesses are, and see what (if any) brainwaves could use some encouragement. 
There is no single relaxation technique that is best for everyone. The right relaxation technique is the one that resonates with you, fits your lifestyle, and is able to focus your mind and interrupt your everyday thoughts to elicit the relaxation response. You may even find that alternating or combining different techniques provides the best results. How you react to stress may also influence the relaxation technique that works best for you:
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
Creativity: Measuring “creativity” is likely subjective, but many people stuck in a certain dominant brain wave may benefit creatively from shifting the brain wave dominance. Someone who has excess beta waves may fail to relax enough to access certain (potential) creative properties associated with increased alpha waves. Similarly someone stuck in a slow wave state may benefit creatively from increasing beta waves.
Our everyday, waking brain used for active intelligence operates at approximately 13 hertz, which is in the range of high alpha or low beta frequencies. People who have certain learning disabilities and problems with attention often have low levels of 13 hertz frequency brainwaves in crucial areas of the brain used for sequencing tasks and doing simple math calculations. This is one concrete example of how brainwaves are associated with thinking and behavior. Each identified brainwave frequency has a different effect on a person’s ability to think, act, and feel.
By the 1980s, entrainment technology had merged with advancements in microelectronics technology, making it possible to develop even more sophisticated audio and visual brainwave entrainment products for the marketplace. In the last two decades, a number of scientific studies have reported brainwave entrainment as an effective remedy for ADD, academic learning problems, and improving memory and cognition.
An invigorating, brain-sharpening session, this audio starts at 14Hz, a beta feel-good frequency, and SR harmonic. It then steps up in six-minute harmonic increments, gradually up to gamma 39Hz, leaving you feeling mentally stimulated and full of energy. A binaural beat track supports the main frequencies for those wearing headphones. Uplifting background music with embedded amplitude modulation provides a further layer of entrainment. Excellent for use as a morning alarm clock, ahead of a big night out, or to inspire those tired trips to the gym.
However, unlike our own brains, which last a lifetime, these mini-brains are relatively short-lived. The human brain has the advantage of a circulatory system, allowing it  to  survive and function. By supplying brain organoids with a special cocktail of factors, they can grow in a dish, develop and survive, but  only to a limited degree. But, by transplanting brain organoids into the brains of living mice, one group of scientists has shown that artificially grown organoids have the potential to resemble a real human brain even more closely when they  are sustained by a living blood supply.

Mood: While brainwave entrainment may not be a great option for depression, particularly in the slower frequency ranges, beta entrainment may improve certain measures of mood. Additionally it is important to consider the fact that many people experience detrimental changes in mood as a result of heightened stress and anxiety. Since brainwave entrainment has been shown to improve stress and relaxation, overstressed individuals may experience a simultaneous mood improvement.
Alpha stimulation: Stimulation of alpha waves has been shown to provide stress-relief among employees, is able to provide pain relief, and improve measures of competence and recognition. If you have significant work-related stress, entraining certain alpha frequencies may help you decrease arousal and improve relaxation. Post-surgical stress doesn’t appear to benefit from alpha stimulation.
Exercise can help you balance your emotions and hormones. Primarily, and almost instantaneously, exercise helps burn through any additional cortisol and adrenaline that linger in your system. These stress hormones cause you to gain weight and put extra stress on your heart and mind. As you burn through the stress hormones, your body can rebalance the other hormones. Without the excess cortisol, your brain can begin producing higher levels of serotonin and dopamine. This can help reduce depression and anxiety while giving you clear thoughts and more focus.
Kickboxing is a powerful means of reducing stress. It involves controlled punching and kicking movements carried out with discipline. You can get quite a rigorous workout in a kickboxing class, and that’s only one of its excellent benefits. Kickboxing regularly will help improve your balance, flexibility, and coordination. It’s also a great way to work out frustration — having an outlet to release energy and anger can relieve stress.
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That is a general assumption people make but there isn’t really much science to back it up. What we do know though is that isochronic tones are ineffective below 4hz, and possibly a bit higher. So for theta and delta entrainment you are best off with binaural beats. In my experience binaural beats will be very effective all the way up to around 40hz.
There appeared to be some evidence that 10 Hz stimulation (alpha waves) improved anxiety, but it wasn’t statistically significant. A study that utilized a ramping format of alpha to theta to delta waves (over the course of 10 minutes) found a significant improvement in anxiety. In terms of long-term stress, there is evidence that alpha and beta stimulation improved measures of “competence” and “emotional exhaustion.”
A common element in recordings incorporating alpha and theta frequencies is a steady but barely perceptible rhythm of the frequencies themselves. This subtle and calming pulse mixes with sounds of gentle breezes, distant bird songs, and the slow progression of deep synth notes. Underneath this, below the audible sounds at sub 16 hertz levels, other frequencies intermingle, deepening the merging of conscious and unconscious mind.
With regard to listening without headphones specifically, you might find it irritating if you are someone who suffers from motion sickness, depending on how the track is created. If you were listening to binaural beats, they really need headphones to work properly. If you are in a room and closer to one speaker you may not even hear binaural beats properly, and if sitting off centre in the room generally, that may have unsettled you if you have motion sickness as the tones try to form a beat in your head. If it was just a standard isochronic tones theta track that shouldn’t be irritating if you have motion sickness.

This is probably the most popular choice of frequency. The theta state is a state of tremendous stress relief. The benefits associated with theta level relaxation include improved concentration, reduced hyperactivity and improved memory. While in a state of theta relaxation, one’s blood pressure, breathing and heart rate all slow to a much more restful and healthy level that promotes natural healing. During theta relaxation one may also experience vivid flashes of mental imagery as the mind opens to memories or subconscious information that is not available to the conscious mind during the normal waking state. The theta state is a very deep state of relaxation that is excellent for deep hypnosis and mental programming.
I appreciate your compliment on my article Henry. I’ve been using and reading up on isochronic tones and brainwave entrainment for many years, so it was just a case of trying to put a lot of what I’ve learnt into one article. I don’t have a great deal of knowledge or experience in using hypnosis and subliminals, so I’m afraid I wouldn’t be in a position to create something so extensive in reviewing them.

Daniel Boone, in Kentucky, made his fortune trading ginseng, although he is remembered as a fur trader. It is reported in a book called Woodland Nuggets of Gold that George Washington wrote to Boone, "The war effort needs money, bring ginseng." American ginseng helped support the revolutionary war effort, and the most valuable cargo to leave New York by ship in that time period was in the Empress of China, which was carrying American ginseng to the Orient.


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Similar to how organisms and their genes compete for survival in the environment and gene pool, ideas compete for survival inside brains, and in the pool of ideas that inhabit them. The famous evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins has used this insightful analogy to explain how ideas spread and evolve over time. In his influential 1976 book, "The Selfish Gene," he refers to ideas as “memes” (the mental analog of a gene), which he has defined as self-replicating units that spread throughout culture. We are all familiar with many types of memes, including the various customs, myths, and trends that have become part of human society.
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