Thanks for making Brain Wave the Top-Selling Brainwave Entrainment App in the App Store! * This update includes support for iOS 6, an optimized UI for iPhone 5, and a new ambient forest background. The app is universal, so you get it across all your devices with one app! Includes optimized UIs for iPhone/iPod Touch, iPhone 5, iPad and support for landscape and portrait orientations.

Theta stimulation: There appears to be no benefit associated with using theta stimulation for cognitive functioning, mood, or stress relief. While theta may be a useful way to induce sleep or alter your state of consciousness, there really isn’t much science supporting entrainment in this particular range for most purposes. Photic stimulation of theta between 5 Hz and 7 Hz can be useful for headaches.

Allow this magical underwater MP3 to take you into a world of your own. This recording brings the user down to a low Alpha state, at 8.5 Hz. This is a deeper session than the “Daydream” meditation, but high enough that inexperienced users should have no problem using it. This can be used with headphones or speakers. Please remember to never listen to these recordings whilst driving or operating machinery of any kind.
Deep relaxation is another major benefit resulting from the brains cortical frequency following response while using brainwave entrainment. As the brain tends to mimic the rate of frequency it is exposed to, thus allowing it to enter into that brainwave state, this helps explain why this technology can produce benefits commonly found with meditation.
A common element in recordings incorporating alpha and theta frequencies is a steady but barely perceptible rhythm of the frequencies themselves. This subtle and calming pulse mixes with sounds of gentle breezes, distant bird songs, and the slow progression of deep synth notes. Underneath this, below the audible sounds at sub 16 hertz levels, other frequencies intermingle, deepening the merging of conscious and unconscious mind.
Turns out, science says there is something to needing “fresh air”—even opening a window can help get more oxygen to your brain, soothing stress. “We live so much of our lives indoors, that when stress hits, one of my go-to techniques is to get outside or open a window,” Dr. Serani says. “Taking in a nice deep breath of crisp fresh air can immediately shift your neurochemistry.” If you’re overwhelmed with work, it can seem hard to take a break; but a quick step outside is even recommended by the American Psychological Association. When you come back, you’ll be recharged and ready to take on the challenge.

To use your senses to quickly relieve stress, you first need to identify the sensory experiences that work best for you. This can require some experimentation. As you employ different senses, note how quickly your stress levels drop. And be as precise as possible. What is the specific kind of sound or type of movement that affects you the most? For example, if you’re a music lover, listen to many different artists and types of music until you find the song that instantly lifts and relaxes you.
When work deadlines begin piling up and your social calendar is booked, the last thing you want to hear is to steer clear of the vending machine. Who has time for healthy eating? But when it comes to combating stress levels, what you eat may actually help relieve your tension. Indeed, some foods may help stabilize blood sugar or, better yet, your emotional response. Here, 12 foods to reach for when you've just about had enough.

Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) is one final type of brainwave that has been studied. SMR, also known as low beta, is a type of brainwave, which occurs in the sensorimotor cortex, in the 12 to 15 hertz range when that area of the sensorimotor cortex is idle and immobile. The purpose of SMR brainwaves is not well understood, but some neurofeedback practitioners report training to increase SMR brainwaves can be beneficial for people with autism, epilepsy, ADD, insomnia, drug addiction, and as an aide to better manage stress.
Many people suffer from insomnia and related sleep problems. Stress can disrupt the regular circadian (time-related) secretion of cortisol and can be a major cause of sleep problems. Cortisol normally obeys the body''s inner clock and responds to light and dark, morning and night. Cortisol levels are highest in the early morning, lower in the afternoon, and lowest at night. Cortisol helps to synchronize activity, patterns of eating, and patterns of sleeping.
“I'm really enjoying the Brain Salon recordings. I was a huge fan of the BrainEv System and found the technology to be a cut above the competition. I often wished you guys would produce recordings for specific purposes, so I was very excited when I heard about the Brain Salon. I love using the Razor Sharp track, it instantly puts me into 'The Zone,' where I'm totally into whatever I'm doing... and do it incredibly well. I also use the Creativity track a lot when I'm doing something that requires lateral thinking. I'm super-excited that you guys went ahead and used the BrainEv technology to create tracks like these. I'd highly recommend anyone to check out the Brain Salon.”
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