Brainwave entrainment music can be used almost anywhere and anytime, making this mood and self-improvement method versatile and flexible enough to do at work, while traveling, or at other times during the day. When used in the workplace during short rest periods, brainwave entrainment techniques can enhance concentration, communication, and work productivity.
If anybody would like to look over the scientific evidence concerning brainwave entrainment and isochronic tones, I’ve done a lot of research over the years which I’ve collected at the PubMed website of NCBI – a branch of the National Institute of Health – that provides access to a large library of medical journal articles. I’ve made my list public so you can look through the journal articles that were published concerning this topic. Here’s the link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/1tmDFOl0XtyA4/collections/51531796/public/. Most of the collection only gives access to abstracts or summaries unless you’re at some kind of educational institution that has a subscription to the particular journal that article is in, but I actually find abstracts really helpful. So have at it, read away. And if your psychiatrist/therapist thinks you’re nuts for feeling better after listening to isochronic tones, just whip out your 82-page collection of scientific journal abstracts written by her peers and give it to her to read. 🙂

15. Melville GW, Chang D, Colagiuri B, Marshall PW, Cheema BC. Fifteen minutes of chair-based yoga postures or guided meditation performed in the office can elicit a relaxation response. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med [Internet]. 2012 [cited 2012 June 27]; Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3265094/?tool=pubmed. doi:10.1155/2012/501986.
This paper describes an arts-science collaborative project titled Standing Waves, which creatively entwines data drawn from the rhythms of the body in sleep/wake cycles with sensor-based technology for synaesthetic performance. The project partners situate their practice and research in the fields of choreography/dance, sleep science and media art and design. Our work explores how the ... [Show full abstract]View full-text
Cvetkovic D, Simpson D, Cosic I (2006). “Influence of sinusoidally modulated visual stimuli at extremely low frequency range on the human EEG activity“. Conference proceedings : … Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference 1: 1311 – 4. doi:10.1109
When you're having a hell of a day—good or bad—checking out for 10-15 minutes is revitalizing. Find a place where you can be alone (and definitely ditch the cell phone)—the attic, the bathroom, a quiet cafe, a big oak tree—and wipe the slate clean for a few minutes. Do whatever it is that relaxes you: Meditate, read a novel, sing or sip tea. It's crucial to take just a few minutes everyday to de-stress. It's not how much time you allot, but being consistent that's important.
Healing music to calm your mind. If you feel an uneasiness, disquiet mind or have the jitters, then this music may just be what you’re looking for. With calming isochronic tones that help you relax (going from 12 Hz – 8.4 Hz and back to 12 hz again), the music has been specifically  selected for it’s tranquility. Youtube Sample for Serenity Calm Music
Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 first group it increases, and for the second decreases. Experimental group did not fall asleep but maintained a relaxation state after the stimulus, while control group achieved unconscious relaxation but the effects did not hold. The STAI “State” indicated that stress increased after the stimulus for control group (see graph A1.2). 14. CONCLUSIONS • Delta (20-200) and theta (20-100) brainwaves are the ones that have greater amplitude (microvolts) in both groups. Results are clearly shown in graphs A1.5 and A1.10. Graph A1.5 Theta Graph A1.10 Delta • Higher frequency EEG waves such as beta waves have less amplitude. This happens because they are not synchronized and have more phase differences in both groups. • An increased alpha parameter is higher in the experimental group, which indicates that they achieved conscious relaxation. In contrast, the control group showed higher delta waves and presented signs of deep sleep during the experiment. Control group also possibly reached REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep halfway throughout the stimulus due theta waves presence in the EEG. • Beta waves are higher in the control group from s = 507 to s = 624 because of unexpected sounds in the stimulus (traffic noise appeared in the original recording). • Both stimuli induced relaxation, but it is important to point out that a person can relax without falling asleep. In this way the binaural stimulus worked better. • It is likely that the control group fell asleep with the nature sounds stimuli because lack of stimulation. • Contrary to what we expected, theta binaural waves didn’t induced FFR in experimental group, although they helped to achieve conscious relaxation. • Delta waves were higher in the experimental group during post-experiment measurements. This suggests that relaxation states were maintained with the absence of stimulus. • Presence of Alpha waves was reduced during deep sleep. This evidence is supported by the control group’s Delta values. • In the absence of stimuli, Delta wave values of the control group decreased, which means that relaxation effects did not prevail. • The effectiveness of an anxiolytic may be measured through the relaxation degree during stimulus and whether its effect endured or not. • For further evaluation of coherence [17] between brainwaves in both hemispheres and the ERP, the use of a 10-20 EEG system is recommended. • Post-experimental STAI “State” tests results are lower in the experimental group. This means that Theta binaural waves were a better anxiolytic than the stimuli (nature sounds) used in the control group. REFERENCES [1] Huang, T., & Charyton, C. (2008). A Comprehensive Review of The Psychological Effects of Brainwave Entrainment. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 14(5). [2] Berger H. (1929) Über Das Elektrenkephalogramm Des Menschen. Arch Psychiatrie Nervenkrankheiten. [3] Chatrian GE, Petersen MC, Lazarte JA. (1960) Responses to clicks from the human brain: some depth electrographic observations. Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol.. [4] Ulam, Frederick A. (1991) An Investigation of the effects of binaural beat frequencies on human brain waves. California School Of Professional Psychology. [5] Notimex. (2013, July 02). México, país con más estrés laboral. El Universal. Retrieved from: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/ciencia/2013/mexico-pais-mas-estres-laboral-78744.html [6] American Psychological Association (n.d.). Stress: The different kinds of stress. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-kinds.aspx [7] R. Padmanabhan, A. J. Hildreth and D. Laws. (2005) A prospective, randomised, experimentalled study examining binaural beat audio and pre-operative anxiety in patients undergoing general anaesthesia for day case surgery. Anaesthesia. 60, 769-773. [8] Loy, Gareth. (2006) Musimathics. London, England: MIT Press. [9] Atwater, F. Holmes. (2009) Frequency Following Response Study. The Monroe Institute. [10] Ferraro, Fernando M., Acuña, Marcelo. (n.d.) Formación Reticular y Fibras de Asociación del Experimental Encefálico. Departamento de anatomia facultad de medicina, UBA. [11]Le Scouarnec, R. P., Poirier, R. M. Owens, J. E., Gauthier, J., Taylor, A. G. and Foresman, P. A. (2001) Use of Binaural beat tapes for treatment on anxiety: a pilot study of tape preference and outcomes. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. [12] Díaz, M. A., & Comeche, M. I. (2004). Beneficios de la relajación. Retrived from: http://www.psicologiadelasalud.es/beneficios_de_la_relajacion.html [13] Gómez García, J. (2003). Efectos de la música trance percusiva y la música trance electrónica en el EEG. Tesis Licenciatura. Psicología. Departamento de Psicología, Escuela de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de las Américas Puebla. Retrieved from:
Deemed as the “the most relaxing brainwave”, delta waves are at their most active when you’re not- they appear when you’re asleep and reduce your overall sense of awareness. Associated with the sub-conscious to unconscious parts of the mind, delta brainwaves are said to be the opening to non-physical states of reality. As a result, this brain state is most often seen while one is in very deep meditation or dreamless sleep.
Writing or talking about the things that prey on you—in a diary, with friends, in a support group or even a home computer file—helps you feel less alone and helpless. One study, published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, looked at people who had either rheumatoid arthritis or asthma— conditions known to be stress-sensitive. One group chronicled in a perfunctory manner the things they did each day. The other group was asked to write daily about what it was like, including fears and pain, to have their disease. What researchers found: People who wrote at length about their feelings had far fewer episodes of their illness.
Winston and Maimes present the historical uses of these herbal remedies in India, Russia, China, and the Americas and explain how they work and why they are so effective at combating stress-induced illness. Monographs for each adaptogen also present the latest scientific research and include the origin, traditional use, actions, properties, preparation, and dosage for each herb.

Targeted hemispheric changes: Some speculate that specific alterations in brain waves can be made on an individual basis. In other words, you can target one frequency in one hemisphere (via the right ear) and another distinct frequency in the other hemisphere (via the left ear). The left ear affects the right hemisphere and right ear affects the left hemisphere.
This is a brainwave meditation MP3 that will stimulate the Theta state of mind, allowing you to relax DEEPLY. On the surface you will hear a gentle rain and deep string sounds… underneath the MP3 uses a complex protocol which alternates stimulation between the left and right ears, and uses several ramps to reach the target brainwave frequency. It is useful for hyperactive people who have problems relaxing or entering trance like states.

This unique session works the opposite to most sessions. It attempts to  ‘dis-entrain’ the brain, breaking stuck thinking patterns and allowing a fresh way of thinking. The recording contains random and chaotic isochronic tones spanning 7.83 to 18 Hz, played over a background of gamma-embedded noise. Use this session to sit back and allow fresh ideas and new connections to form. Finishes at the illuminating14Hz sensorimotor rhythm frequency.
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