Take a hint from Taylor Swift and literally shake your body to release tension—but you probably want to do this one in private, or your coworkers might wonder what you’re up to! “In Africa and other cultures, shaking therapy is used for emotional healing—literally shaking off your perceived emotional threat of fear, self-doubt, or worry,” Miller says. “Next time you find yourself emotional because of a specific situation that side swipes you in life, imagine the irritation beading up on your body and start shaking it off from your feet all the way up to the top of your head.” Picture an animal shaking off after getting out of the water, and use the shaking as a release of the emotional attachments causing you stress. Plus, “most of the time when I use this technique, I end up flipping my frustration into laughter, which is always a great endorphin mood booster!” Miller says. Here are more proven ways to boost your mood.

It may be that you had the volume too loud, but I would expect you to hear the effects of that straight after you’ve stopped listening, not on a day you haven’t used them. It might be something similar to muscle memory, where you suddenly remembered the sound and sensations it gives you as if you were hearing it again. I don’t know how long you’ve been using this type of thing for, but maybe it’s something that will settle down and disappear once you become more accustomed to the sound.

Given that brainwaves control and connect such a vast range of human experience from thought to feelings to actions, it is easy to see how the deliberate control of brainwaves can affect mood, behaviors, motivation, and even physical health. Brainwave entrainment is a safe, simple, and scientifically proven method for quickly guiding the brain into a beneficial brainwave frequency to facilitate healthy sleep, lower stress, heal emotional problems, and improve physical health.
Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 nature (birds and wind) while the second group listened to theta binaural sound waves. Both groups listened to the stimulus through headphones. During the experiment, participants were monitored with the Neurosky Mindwave Interface, which was connected through Processing to a Max Patch that saved all the data in a ‘.csv’ file. Before the stimulus, a baseline EEG took place and the participants answered the “Trait” part of the STAI test and a pre-experiment “State” version of the test. After the experiment, participants answered a post-experiment “State” STAI and a post-experiment EEG also took place. Each experiment was developed with one participant at a time in a controlled environment. American Psychological Association Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct 2002 were followed. 6. MATERIALS • Herman Miller chair • Neurosky Mindwave Interface • Maximum Voltage – 1mV • Maximum radiofrequency Range (Bluetooth) 10m • Maximum transference rate through RF – 250kb/s • Sample rate – 512Hz • Battery cycle – 6-8h • MacBook Pro 7. SOFTWARE • Processing 1.5.1 • Microsoft Excel • Max 6 • Braintocsv V1.5: Application developed in Max 6 by Santiago Rentería, which collates data gathered from the Mindwave interface into a ‘.csv’ file. 8. DOCUMENTS • STAI questionnaire (Annex 2) • STAI “Trait”: Measures anxiety as a temporal state. • STAI “State”: Measures anxiety based on how people feel on a daily basis. • Consent Letter (Annex 3) 9. CONTROL ENVIRONMENT Recording Studio Control Room located at Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe. Fixed temperature at 22ºC and acoustically isolated. 10. STIMULI • Experimental group – Binaural Theta frequencies • Control group – Nature environmental sounds 11. PROCEDURE • The participant is asked to read and sign a consent letter. • A pre-experimental three-minute encephalogram is taken and the participant is required to answer State and Trait STAI tests. • The corresponding stimulus is played during ten minutes and an EEG is taken. • The State STAI test is answered and a post-experiment EEG is taken. 12. VISUAL DATA ANALYSIS The stimuli took place from second 180 to second 774. (Graphs in Annex 1) 12.1 Theta The significant time range was from second 3 to second 948. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.5) s = 189; p = 0.014; t = 1.025 s = 495; p = 0.002; t = -1.923 s = 780; p = 0.001; t = -2.349 12.2 Meditation The significant time range was from second 240 to second 912. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.3) s = 240; p = 0.042; t = .0.685 s = 522; p = 0.013; t = 0.546 s = 702; p = 0.016; t = 0.897 12.3 Delta The significant time range was from second 12 to second 954. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.10) s = 177; p = 0.046; t = 1.696 s = 627; p = 0.016; t = -1.366 s = 912; p = 0.007; t = 1.758 12.4 Attention The significant time range was from second 243 to second 870. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.11) s = 243; p = 0.021; t = 0.672 s = 513; p = 0.005; t = 0.722 s = 753; p = 0.017; t = 0.383 12.5 STAI Variations were found in STAI-State pre-experiment and post-experiment: • Control group results rose from 19 to 21 • Experimental group results decreased from 20 to 15. Variations between both groups were found in the STAI –Trait: • Experimental group with a score of 32 in STAI-T test outran control group by 4 points 13. RESULT ANALYSIS Samples were analyzed every three seconds. They were later statistically distributed according to the T-student test in order to find differences between both groups. For this experiment, the significant p value was p<0.05, this means that the probability is less than 5% T-student detailed analysis: • The meditation value is similar in both groups, (see graph A1.3). T-student function shows less significant points for this parameter. This means both stimuli induced relaxation to the participants. • Theta values are higher in the control group, especially after second 510 (see graph A1.5) almost at the middle of the stimulus. • STAI “State” post-experiment results from the experimental group are higher than the control. Therefore, theta binaural frequencies were more effective as an anxiolytic stimulus. (see graphs A1.1 and A1.2) • Delta values are higher after second 285 in the control group (see graph A1.10). This indicates deep sleep and losing of consciousness over the body (unconscious relaxation). It is highly possible that the participant fell asleep or got to the first stages of sleep. • There is a significant difference in delta between experimental and control groups after second 870 (post-stimulus). For the
As you close your eyes, this session quickly lulls you down into deep delta sleep, where the body recovers and grows. The session starts at a waking frequency, soon taking you down deep into delta, with stops at sigificant beneficial frequencies such as the de-stressing 10Hz, the grounding 7.83Hz Schumann resonance (SR), and the deeply relaxing 5.5Hz. You’ll soon find yourself in a deep, healing sleep. If you’re particularly stressed, try listening to Power Chill before starting
×