Limiting your cash withdrawals to once a week is a quick, easy way to monitor your spending habits. Multiple trips to the ATM make it harder to track your money. If you put yourself on an allowance and pay cash for everything, you're more aware of what you're spending and more careful about what you buy. And while thinking about your finances may be enough to send you over the edge, it turns out that getting them under control eases tension in the long run. (Money and work tied for first place as the leading sources of stress, according to an APA survey.) When you have a weekend afternoon free, try this take-control move: Write everything down, so you can see exactly where you stand financially--what you owe, the amount of interest, your monthly income, your budget. Not facing what you're up against creates even more stress, because it's always in the back of your mind. But once you have the information down, you can begin setting concrete goals using real figures. And taking action will make you feel so much better.

Many of the long-term side-effects of menopause are associated with a deficiency in magnesium. These include heart disease, osteoporosis, weakness, weight gain, and feeling cold all the time. When you take a magnesium supplement, it can help relieve many of these problems and help your body balance your hormones. Magnesium can boost your energy by helping to convert the T4 thyroid hormone into the more active and bioavailable T3. It can also help the liver reduce levels of cortisol, adrenaline, and excessive estrogen.
Stress affects your whole body, so find a pick-me-up for each of your senses. Turning on a favorite tune uses your sense of hearing for a science-backed burst of good feeling, and using aromatherapy uses your sense of smell to relax you. “Oils like lavender and lemon reduce stress,” Dr. Serani says. “Also, don’t forget that your sense of smell is the most nostalgic of all your senses,” so if you have a scent that reminds you of comfort, keep it on hand to sniff when you’re freaking out. Your sense of touch can be employed by stroking a “talisman”—a favorite or sentimental item—or even an “intention stick,” which you can hold like a wand to feel more in control. Chew gum to use your sense of taste to curb stress (scientists think it’s the lasting flavor, not just the act of chewing itself, that makes gum such a great stress reliever). Besides using your mind’s eye to visualize a happy place, you can use your sense of sight to look at calming images—cat videos on the Internet have actually been scientifically proven to lower stress.

Attention and learning ability has been suggested to improve as a result of beta stimulation protocols. Research has shown that beta waves tend to be deficient among those who have learning disabilities and/or attention deficits. Other research with photic stimulation determined that stimulating 14 Hz and alternating it with 22 Hz over several sessions produced significant GPA improvements.


Long-distance running, biking, cross-country skiing, and other outdoor activities provide a change of scenery and a dose of fresh air, both of which can help clear your mind, Plante says. Also, outdoor settings such as mountains, a biking trail, or a neighborhood park are pleasant places to spend time in. Beautiful settings, especially in spring and fall, can lift your mood and shake up your workout routine.
Group exercise or encouraging stressed clients to find a workout partner is an excellent idea because it can provide a support network and accountability. However, there might be clients who find a group setting intimidating or competitive, which could be counterproductive in managing stress. In addition, those who report stress because of work or family obligations might enjoy the solitude of exercising alone. Using a variety of exercises or nontraditional exercises (e.g., exergaming, dance classes, yard work, or rock climbing) is a way to plan activities that are enjoyable to maximize adherence. Knowing your clients’ exercise barriers and stressors will help with planning an exercise program that can address these variables to maximize the benefits for health and stress management.

My name is ******. I’m a systems engineer which have worked on the engineering field for over 20 years. During the last few years I have faced some personal challenges which have put a lot of my abilities to a test. Over a year now I got the “Equisync II” CDs from the EOC Institute, and the results from the very beginning were really amazing. Even as an engineer it was not easy to understand the incredible benefits of this brainwaves therapy when used consistently.
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. While apps and audio downloads can guide you through the process, all you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
As soon as this session begins, the 10Hz frequency kicks in, helping to release your worries, brighten your mood, and encourage release of the happy hormone, serotonin. This is followed by progressive patterns of euphoria-inducing beta frequencies, each building on the last, helping you to get you energized and feeling great. The uplifting background also gives this session an added kick. An excellent way to start the day - but don’t use it too late, as it may disrupt your sleep patterns.
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