“There is some exciting preliminary data, based largely on animal models, that components in cannabis can be neuroprotective and may possibly hold keys to addressing the aging process in the brain and/or age-related disorders,” Paul Armentano, the deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), told Healthline.
Thanks for the reply. I am now clearer on ‘what’ is heard. Can you expand or point me in direction ..a bit more about ‘pitch frequency’ and frequency spoken about and what exactly is the difference ..and how we use the higher pitch frequencies to ‘hear’ or become aware of them? Would you only pick up the low freq on a EEG?. sorry for being pedantic ..it still does not clear up split isochronics and possibly creating same situation as binaural beats..
The studies included in the recent reviews of Tai Chi and yoga indicate that sessions between 60 and 90 minutes performed 2 to 3 days per week were effective in reducing stress and improving feelings of well-being (7,14,17). A study conducted in a worksite environment showed that 15 minutes of chair-based yoga postures was effective in reducing acute stress when assessed by self-report and with physiological measures (e.g., respiration rate and heart rate variability parameters). This finding indicates that shorter duration sessions can be effective in reducing acute stress with this type of exercise (15).
Exercise and stress research has typically focused on aerobic exercise. There have been consistent findings that people report feeling calmer after a 20- to 30-minute bout of aerobic exercise, and the calming effect can last for several hours after exercise. Recently, there has been an increased amount of research on the role of mind-body types of exercise such as yoga or Tai Chi. Unfortunately, there is somewhat limited research on the role of resistance exercise in stress management.

Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 nature (birds and wind) while the second group listened to theta binaural sound waves. Both groups listened to the stimulus through headphones. During the experiment, participants were monitored with the Neurosky Mindwave Interface, which was connected through Processing to a Max Patch that saved all the data in a ‘.csv’ file. Before the stimulus, a baseline EEG took place and the participants answered the “Trait” part of the STAI test and a pre-experiment “State” version of the test. After the experiment, participants answered a post-experiment “State” STAI and a post-experiment EEG also took place. Each experiment was developed with one participant at a time in a controlled environment. American Psychological Association Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct 2002 were followed. 6. MATERIALS • Herman Miller chair • Neurosky Mindwave Interface • Maximum Voltage – 1mV • Maximum radiofrequency Range (Bluetooth) 10m • Maximum transference rate through RF – 250kb/s • Sample rate – 512Hz • Battery cycle – 6-8h • MacBook Pro 7. SOFTWARE • Processing 1.5.1 • Microsoft Excel • Max 6 • Braintocsv V1.5: Application developed in Max 6 by Santiago Rentería, which collates data gathered from the Mindwave interface into a ‘.csv’ file. 8. DOCUMENTS • STAI questionnaire (Annex 2) • STAI “Trait”: Measures anxiety as a temporal state. • STAI “State”: Measures anxiety based on how people feel on a daily basis. • Consent Letter (Annex 3) 9. CONTROL ENVIRONMENT Recording Studio Control Room located at Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe. Fixed temperature at 22ºC and acoustically isolated. 10. STIMULI • Experimental group – Binaural Theta frequencies • Control group – Nature environmental sounds 11. PROCEDURE • The participant is asked to read and sign a consent letter. • A pre-experimental three-minute encephalogram is taken and the participant is required to answer State and Trait STAI tests. • The corresponding stimulus is played during ten minutes and an EEG is taken. • The State STAI test is answered and a post-experiment EEG is taken. 12. VISUAL DATA ANALYSIS The stimuli took place from second 180 to second 774. (Graphs in Annex 1) 12.1 Theta The significant time range was from second 3 to second 948. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.5) s = 189; p = 0.014; t = 1.025 s = 495; p = 0.002; t = -1.923 s = 780; p = 0.001; t = -2.349 12.2 Meditation The significant time range was from second 240 to second 912. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.3) s = 240; p = 0.042; t = .0.685 s = 522; p = 0.013; t = 0.546 s = 702; p = 0.016; t = 0.897 12.3 Delta The significant time range was from second 12 to second 954. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.10) s = 177; p = 0.046; t = 1.696 s = 627; p = 0.016; t = -1.366 s = 912; p = 0.007; t = 1.758 12.4 Attention The significant time range was from second 243 to second 870. The most significant moments were the following: (see annex A1.11) s = 243; p = 0.021; t = 0.672 s = 513; p = 0.005; t = 0.722 s = 753; p = 0.017; t = 0.383 12.5 STAI Variations were found in STAI-State pre-experiment and post-experiment: • Control group results rose from 19 to 21 • Experimental group results decreased from 20 to 15. Variations between both groups were found in the STAI –Trait: • Experimental group with a score of 32 in STAI-T test outran control group by 4 points 13. RESULT ANALYSIS Samples were analyzed every three seconds. They were later statistically distributed according to the T-student test in order to find differences between both groups. For this experiment, the significant p value was p<0.05, this means that the probability is less than 5% T-student detailed analysis: • The meditation value is similar in both groups, (see graph A1.3). T-student function shows less significant points for this parameter. This means both stimuli induced relaxation to the participants. • Theta values are higher in the control group, especially after second 510 (see graph A1.5) almost at the middle of the stimulus. • STAI “State” post-experiment results from the experimental group are higher than the control. Therefore, theta binaural frequencies were more effective as an anxiolytic stimulus. (see graphs A1.1 and A1.2) • Delta values are higher after second 285 in the control group (see graph A1.10). This indicates deep sleep and losing of consciousness over the body (unconscious relaxation). It is highly possible that the participant fell asleep or got to the first stages of sleep. • There is a significant difference in delta between experimental and control groups after second 870 (post-stimulus). For the
Among the four dominant types of brainwaves, the Theta wave has earned the reputation of perhaps being the “most creative”. The dominant pattern when people are in the dream stages of their sleep, a person with increased Theta brainwaves during waking activity has a very high level of thinking and creativity. With a high amplitude and frequency of 4 Hz to 8 Hz, Theta waves are often dominant in the brain’s right hemisphere, which is also the hemisphere of highly-creative people. Here are some of the benefits you might enjoy with an increased Theta brainwave production:
Take a hint from Taylor Swift and literally shake your body to release tension—but you probably want to do this one in private, or your coworkers might wonder what you’re up to! “In Africa and other cultures, shaking therapy is used for emotional healing—literally shaking off your perceived emotional threat of fear, self-doubt, or worry,” Miller says. “Next time you find yourself emotional because of a specific situation that side swipes you in life, imagine the irritation beading up on your body and start shaking it off from your feet all the way up to the top of your head.” Picture an animal shaking off after getting out of the water, and use the shaking as a release of the emotional attachments causing you stress. Plus, “most of the time when I use this technique, I end up flipping my frustration into laughter, which is always a great endorphin mood booster!” Miller says. Here are more proven ways to boost your mood.
Maya Mendoza is a published author of 3 personal development books. She has run an NLP / EFT Practice for 29 years helping clients transform problems into personal power. Maya is also a accomplished copywriter and well known Digital Marketing & Social Social Media Strategist - Specializing in Google+ for business. She was named "best marketing consultant" in Glasgow, UK in 2013.  
A high quality binaural beat MP3 inspired by the brainwave patterns of Zen meditators. A deep ambiance of strings with opera tones can be heard. This MP3 is inspired by the work of Maxwell Cade and his research with experienced Zen meditators. Cade noticed that this pattern emerged after deeper Zen meditations, and so this is often called the “afterglow of meditation.” Note: that this recording uses binaural beats. – headphones are required. Please remember to never listen to this music whilst driving or operating machinery of any kind.
My relaxation program calms your mind and relaxes your body without making you drowsy. You can use the full one hour program whenever you’d like to ease your stress and anxiety, and regain your mental focus. The program also includes a short 10 minute “instant mental refresher” for when you need a quick break from a hectic day. This program is designed for anyone suffering from constant stress and anxiety so that you can…
I’ve been using equisync first thing in the morning after I get up, and listen to all three tracks in a row. I again listen to all three tracks in the late afternoon. If I don’t have that much time available, I will start on Track 2 or 3, as necessary. I have really started to focus on my breathing, and notice the difference – I finish the session in a DEEPLY relaxed state.
As somewhat of a modern mystic, I have studied altered states of consciousness, but due to my monkey mind, I have only been able to experience them to a very minor degree. I have tried so many methods of meditation to little avail. But I became aware that I would not be able to progress in my spiritual life if I could not achieve at least a modicum of success in meditation.
Group exercise or encouraging stressed clients to find a workout partner is an excellent idea because it can provide a support network and accountability. However, there might be clients who find a group setting intimidating or competitive, which could be counterproductive in managing stress. In addition, those who report stress because of work or family obligations might enjoy the solitude of exercising alone. Using a variety of exercises or nontraditional exercises (e.g., exergaming, dance classes, yard work, or rock climbing) is a way to plan activities that are enjoyable to maximize adherence. Knowing your clients’ exercise barriers and stressors will help with planning an exercise program that can address these variables to maximize the benefits for health and stress management.
“Brainwave entrainment has powerful benefits, that's clear. But most brainwave entrainment CDs tend to be non-specific, across the board. What if you want to achieve one particular state, 'cos that's what you need right now? That's possible with these Brain Salon sessions! You want to chill out, get ideas, go to sleep, feel energized or happy, or get 100% mentally switched-on - just listen to the session and you've got it! You 'get the hang' of these states too, so after enough practice you don't even need the brainwave entrainment CDs to control your own mind. It's worked for me, and I'm sure will do the same for you too.”
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