Filed Under: iAwake Weekly Call, Life Optimization, Meaning of Life, Meditation Technology, Practice of Meditation, Profound Meditation Program, Spiritual Development, Waking Up Tagged With: Benefits of Brainwave Entrainment Meditation, Changing Our Brains, Conscious Evolution, Life Optimization, Meditation Technology, practice of meditation, Spiritual Development, spiritual practice, Waking Up
Recently developed entrainment software has been designed to correct specific imbalances in hemispheric activity associated with undesirable mind-states. For example, people suffering with depression often have more activity in the right hemisphere, and specially designed brainwave music decreases this activity while increasing activity in the left hemisphere, reducing depression.
ADHD: In 1997, various researchers conducted a study testing whether children with ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) would benefit from audio-visual entrainment in a school setting. The researchers entrained a small sample of 34 students from 2 different schools. They were given audio-visual entrainment for a period of 1 month and 3 weeks at various times throughout the school day.
Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 first group it increases, and for the second decreases. Experimental group did not fall asleep but maintained a relaxation state after the stimulus, while control group achieved unconscious relaxation but the effects did not hold. The STAI “State” indicated that stress increased after the stimulus for control group (see graph A1.2). 14. CONCLUSIONS • Delta (20-200) and theta (20-100) brainwaves are the ones that have greater amplitude (microvolts) in both groups. Results are clearly shown in graphs A1.5 and A1.10. Graph A1.5 Theta Graph A1.10 Delta • Higher frequency EEG waves such as beta waves have less amplitude. This happens because they are not synchronized and have more phase differences in both groups. • An increased alpha parameter is higher in the experimental group, which indicates that they achieved conscious relaxation. In contrast, the control group showed higher delta waves and presented signs of deep sleep during the experiment. Control group also possibly reached REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep halfway throughout the stimulus due theta waves presence in the EEG. • Beta waves are higher in the control group from s = 507 to s = 624 because of unexpected sounds in the stimulus (traffic noise appeared in the original recording). • Both stimuli induced relaxation, but it is important to point out that a person can relax without falling asleep. In this way the binaural stimulus worked better. • It is likely that the control group fell asleep with the nature sounds stimuli because lack of stimulation. • Contrary to what we expected, theta binaural waves didn’t induced FFR in experimental group, although they helped to achieve conscious relaxation. • Delta waves were higher in the experimental group during post-experiment measurements. This suggests that relaxation states were maintained with the absence of stimulus. • Presence of Alpha waves was reduced during deep sleep. This evidence is supported by the control group’s Delta values. • In the absence of stimuli, Delta wave values of the control group decreased, which means that relaxation effects did not prevail. • The effectiveness of an anxiolytic may be measured through the relaxation degree during stimulus and whether its effect endured or not. • For further evaluation of coherence [17] between brainwaves in both hemispheres and the ERP, the use of a 10-20 EEG system is recommended. • Post-experimental STAI “State” tests results are lower in the experimental group. This means that Theta binaural waves were a better anxiolytic than the stimuli (nature sounds) used in the control group. REFERENCES [1] Huang, T., & Charyton, C. (2008). A Comprehensive Review of The Psychological Effects of Brainwave Entrainment. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 14(5). [2] Berger H. (1929) Über Das Elektrenkephalogramm Des Menschen. Arch Psychiatrie Nervenkrankheiten. [3] Chatrian GE, Petersen MC, Lazarte JA. (1960) Responses to clicks from the human brain: some depth electrographic observations. Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol.. [4] Ulam, Frederick A. (1991) An Investigation of the effects of binaural beat frequencies on human brain waves. California School Of Professional Psychology. [5] Notimex. (2013, July 02). México, país con más estrés laboral. El Universal. Retrieved from: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/ciencia/2013/mexico-pais-mas-estres-laboral-78744.html [6] American Psychological Association (n.d.). Stress: The different kinds of stress. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-kinds.aspx [7] R. Padmanabhan, A. J. Hildreth and D. Laws. (2005) A prospective, randomised, experimentalled study examining binaural beat audio and pre-operative anxiety in patients undergoing general anaesthesia for day case surgery. Anaesthesia. 60, 769-773. [8] Loy, Gareth. (2006) Musimathics. London, England: MIT Press. [9] Atwater, F. Holmes. (2009) Frequency Following Response Study. The Monroe Institute. [10] Ferraro, Fernando M., Acuña, Marcelo. (n.d.) Formación Reticular y Fibras de Asociación del Experimental Encefálico. Departamento de anatomia facultad de medicina, UBA. [11]Le Scouarnec, R. P., Poirier, R. M. Owens, J. E., Gauthier, J., Taylor, A. G. and Foresman, P. A. (2001) Use of Binaural beat tapes for treatment on anxiety: a pilot study of tape preference and outcomes. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. [12] Díaz, M. A., & Comeche, M. I. (2004). Beneficios de la relajación. Retrived from: http://www.psicologiadelasalud.es/beneficios_de_la_relajacion.html [13] Gómez García, J. (2003). Efectos de la música trance percusiva y la música trance electrónica en el EEG. Tesis Licenciatura. Psicología. Departamento de Psicología, Escuela de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de las Américas Puebla. Retrieved from:
Hi Et, In all the feedback and studies I’ve read and looked into over the years, I’ve seen lots of feedback from people talking about how they don’t like the sound of the tones, or they find them irritating in some way. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any particular reason why one person likes it and the next doesn’t. It’s a bit like normal music, one person’s sweet symphony is another person pneumatic drill. It’s common for people to find it weird and maybe annoying at first, which is how I felt in the beginning. But usually after a few listens you can start to get used to it and appreciate the sound, and especially the feeling it gives you. Personally, I think it can help if you try to embrace the sound, psychologically speaking beforehand. It can also help to have the sound playing at a very low volume, to begin with, then building it up as you get more used to it.
According to a recent study published in the British journal Heart, slow or meditative music is a proven stress buster, so set your dial to a soothing station during your commute. And, if you're stuck in a traffic jam, sneak in this quick exercise: Grab your steering wheel and clench the muscles in your fingers, arms, shoulders and back. Do this until your muscles begin to tremble (about 45 seconds), then release. You'll produce a wave of relief in your upper neck and arms all the way down to your fingers. Just make sure your foot is on the brake when you let go of the wheel! (FYI: pink noise is the newest tool for reducing stress.)
This music encourages a state of delta relaxation. Delta brainwaves are most prevalent during deep, dreamless sleep. The delta state is a mostly unconscious state that is essential to one’s physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual wellbeing. People who are able to achieve a state of delta relaxation through meditation will sometimes describe spiritual encounters and out of body experiences. The delta state is perfect for inducing profound spiritual experiences, healing and deep subconscious repatterning. Delta frequency brainwave entrainment music is also a fantastic cure for insomnia.
Escape from a stressful situation by remembering a favorite vacation spot or a place where you feel cozy and at home. “Make sure to take note of every detail of your favorite spot—the more detailed your visualization, the more stress gets kicked to the curb,” Dr. Serani says. “For me, it’s a beautiful spot on the beach in my native Long Island. But it’s not just the white velvet sand of the beach or the teal blue ocean water; it’s the sounds of the surf, the tang of the salt water, the feel of the sun, the waves in the distance, and the imagined walk I take along the water.” You can combine this with a three-word mantra like “blue-ocean-water,” Serani suggests. Miller calls the visualization of a memory that evokes a positive association an “anchor.” She remembers watching beautiful sunsets in Costa Rica. “Now that I am back in the hustle and bustle of life, I will often pause and take mini-retreats, bringing up the anchored experience of inner calm that I felt watching the sunsets,” she says.
Move your focus to the sole of your right foot. Tune in to any sensations you feel in that part of your body and imagine each breath flowing from the sole of your foot. After one or two minutes, move your focus to your right ankle and repeat. Move to your calf, knee, thigh, hip, and then repeat the sequence for your left leg. From there, move up the torso, through the lower back and abdomen, the upper back and chest, and the shoulders. Pay close attention to any area of the body that causes you pain or discomfort.
The  human brain is made up of billions of neurons which need to communicate in order for our brains to function as a whole. The point at which two neurons meet is called a synapse and chemical signals are transported between neurons, across these synapses. Not only were the scientists able to show that the transplanted organoids developed mature neurons,  but also that these neurons were able to form synapses with each other,  and with resident neurons in the mouse brain.
When the brain is stimulated with pulsed sounds (neuroelectrical activity via the nerves originating from the ears), the overall activity of the brain will respond to and align with these pulses. By selecting the desired rate, the brain via the frequency following response (entrainment) can be naturally induced towards the selected brainwave state.
Hi Jason, thanks for all the uploads to youtube. I’ve been using them in work recently to help me concentrate and relax. I like the music tracks that you’ve chosen to overlay the tones. A couple of times in the last 2 weeks I’ve experienced the wavy pulse like sound, similar to the tones in my left ear. I wasn’t listening to tracks at the time or that day. It doesn’t last but it feels a bit strange. I wondered if I might have been listening to the tracks too loudly and that it was almost like a type of tinnitus. I’m curious to know if anyone has been in touch with you in the past to say they’ve had a similar experience?

Vitex encourages the pituitary gland to produce progesterone naturally. It can help bolster your natural supply of progesterone and balance out your estrogen. By balancing out these two hormones, your body does not go through as many mood swings or hot flashes. Thus, it can also relieve the stress on the adrenal glands, further helping to reduce stress.


Calling all chocoholics: a regular healthy indulgence (just a bite, not a whole bar!) of dark chocolate might have the power to regulate your stress levels. "Research has shown that it can reduce your stress hormones, including cortisol," Sass says. "Also, the antioxidants in cocoa trigger the walls of your blood vessels to relax, lowering blood pressure and improving circulation. And finally, dark chocolate contains unique natural substances that create a sense of euphoria similar to the feeling of being in love!" Go for varieties that contain at least 70% cocoa.
Joseph Kao, creator of Journey to the Center of the Self, a deep, 30-minute, guided transpersonal meditation, accompanied by music embedded with advanced brainwave entrainment technology and followed by 30 minutes of only the brainwave entrainment music, talks with iAwake’s CEO, John Dupuy, about all that went into the making of this meditation tool masterpiece. Transcending and Including the Little Self John:           One thing I find so remarkable about your guided meditation in Journey to … [Read more...]
The use of brainwave entrainment techniques offers many benefits for overall health and well-being, including improved emotional stability, increased cognitive function, and a deepening of creative insight. Much of this benefit derives from the hemispheric synchronization occurring as a result of entrained brainwaves. This effect happens when the electrical impulses in both hemispheres synchronized to the same frequency being delivered through the entrainment source.
Doing almost any routine, repetitive activity (like vacuuming, shredding paper or knitting), or reciting a word that represents how you wish you felt (such as calm) is a quick way to achieve a Zen-like state. Studies show the effects lower blood pressure and slow heart rate and breathing. The crucial elements are to focus on a word, your breathing or a movement and to bring your attention back to your task if your mind wanders or negative thoughts intrude. Or look to your faith for a mantra: A recent study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing found that repeating phrases with spiritual meanings helped participants cope with a range of problems, from anxiety to insomnia.
While people have full control of themselves when they are conscious, it’s a whole different ballgame when it comes to dealing with their subconscious. However, with regular production of Theta brainwaves, you’re able to eliminate any emotional blockages you may have, allowing you to accept suggestions and ideas more, helping you re-program your brain to suit your needs.
Popular stress relief “solutions” we often turn to may offer a temporary reprieve, but actually make our situation worse in the long run. Alcohol puts additional physical stress on the liver and brain; mindless forms of entertainment like TV deaden our mental focus which is vital to handling stressful situations; and prescription drugs targeting stress and anxiety usually have side-effects far worse than the symptoms they’re treating!

Thanks for your compliment on my article. 🙂 There are some frequency lists which reference and quote some links to metabolism, but I don’t know how effective or reliable that information is. One of the good things but also a drawback of this technology is how accessible it is to use and create tracks. That makes it unattractive for big companies to invest in large-scale research because it’s hard to patent and protect any product they produce based on the research. As soon as they released the frequency data, people like me would produce free videos and cheap MP3s to utilise the research, so they wouldn’t be able to get a good return on their research investment. So to try and gain some insight into what is working for people, at the moment, we are relying upon assessing anecdotal feedback in many areas. Before buying any products/tracks for increasing metabolism, I would look for and try out free videos on YouTube first, to try and gauge how those particular tracks and frequencies work for you.


Hello Jason, this is an unusually thoughtful discussion. Thank you for all your expertise and your kind manner of presenting and moderating it. I’m wondering if you have any experience with this: ever since I’ve been exposed to theta wave music, without headphones, I have found it irritating. And this is in spite of the fact that when I was first handed a CD by someone I knew well and trusted he was so confident I’d love it It didn’t occur to either of us that I might not. This happened again recently, which is about 10 years later, when I heard it playing overhead at an acupuncture clinic. I felt restless and even irritated, unable to zone out, which is unusual for me, during the treatment. I realized that the quality of my irritation was similar to what I’d felt listening to that CD a decade ago.So I asked if it was theta wave music and she said yes. The acupuncturist said that some people, but a vast minority, really dislike the music. She said that the few people who dislike it are not simply neutral, but actively dislike it. And she also said, but most people like it a lot. I’m just wondering what kind of factors might be present that would make a person feel so irritated by this music?
15. Melville GW, Chang D, Colagiuri B, Marshall PW, Cheema BC. Fifteen minutes of chair-based yoga postures or guided meditation performed in the office can elicit a relaxation response. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med [Internet]. 2012 [cited 2012 June 27]; Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3265094/?tool=pubmed. doi:10.1155/2012/501986.
That is a general assumption people make but there isn’t really much science to back it up. What we do know though is that isochronic tones are ineffective below 4hz, and possibly a bit higher. So for theta and delta entrainment you are best off with binaural beats. In my experience binaural beats will be very effective all the way up to around 40hz.
Altered states of consciousness: In as early as 1987 it was discovered that photic stimulation at specific frequencies produced an altered state of consciousness. An extremely small study with just 4 individuals involved photic stimulation at 6 Hz, 10 Hz, and 18 Hz. The results were reported to have altered their conscious awareness. This really isn’t that surprising to anyone that’s used brainwave entrainment therapy.

Also, don’t you think that the inherent hemispheric synchronization using binaural beats might be a positive benefit within itself? While it’s true that the huge majority of us use both sides of our brains most of the time, it’s also true that many of us are a bit polarized to one side or the other in general, or when doing a particular kind of activity or focus. I’ve found stimulating a more equally and consistently whole brain activity has it’s own benefits other than the entrainment aspect.
There are various types of viruses and parasites, and viruses are themselves parasites. While biological viruses are infectious agents that self-replicate inside living cells, computer viruses are destructive pieces of code that insert themselves into existing programs and change the actions of those programs. One particularly nasty type of computer virus that relies on humans for replication, known as a “Trojan horse,” disguises itself as something useful or interesting in order to persuade individuals to download and spread it. Similarly, a harmful ideology disguises itself as something beneficial in order to insert itself into the brain of an individual, so that it can instruct them to behave in ways that transmit the mental virus to others. The ability for parasites to modify the behavior of hosts in ways that increase their own “fitness” (i.e., their ability to survive and reproduce) while hurting the fitness of the host, is known as “parasitic manipulation.”
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