Those with an active imagination might picture the organoid taking over, creating some sort of “hybrid-consciousness.” They wouldn’t be foolish for thinking  so. Consciousness is a difficult term to grasp. It is a topic that still  has scientists scratching their heads. In fact, most scientists believe  that the origin of consciousness lies outside the realm of scientific inquiry. One thing that scientists can agree on though is that consciousness needs the brain, and that the neural circuits of which the brain is comprised are essential for certain aspects of consciousness. Therefore, if consciousness can be boiled down to neural connections then experiments like this raises interesting question about  whether consciousness can therefore be grown in the lab and it’s  ethical consequences.
I also believe that the dangers of brainwave entrainment should be further explored as well. There are relatively vague benefits, but it remains unclear as to whether entraining certain frequencies may be detrimental to performance or induce harm. Despite the fact that brainwave entrainment has existed for a long term, it remains an understudied niche in neuroscience.
Headaches: There are several reports of brainwave entrainment providing therapeutic benefit for those suffering from general headaches or migraines. A study in 1985 analyzed photic stimulation within the theta range (5 Hz to 8 Hz) and discovered that this protocol provided significant headache relief. A total of 19/24 participants noted that the “slow wave” photic stimulation provided “complete relief” from chronic headaches and migraines.

A combination of strokes works well to relieve muscle tension. Try gentle chops with the edge of your hands or tapping with fingers or cupped palms. Put fingertip pressure on muscle knots. Knead across muscles, and try long, light, gliding strokes. You can apply these strokes to any part of the body that falls easily within your reach. For a short session like this, try focusing on your neck and head:
Binaural beats are created from two different continuous tones, which when sent separately to each ear create a single beat inside your head. Isochronic tones are basically a single tone which is switched on and off at regular intervals. Imagine a single continuous tone playing on a stereo system and you’ve got your hand on the volume switch. Then once per second, you turn the volume off for half a second and keep doing that every second. For half a second the volume is off, for the other half a beat waveform is formed. The beat is cycling once per second per second, i.e. at a rate of 1Hz.
With regard to listening without headphones specifically, you might find it irritating if you are someone who suffers from motion sickness, depending on how the track is created. If you were listening to binaural beats, they really need headphones to work properly. If you are in a room and closer to one speaker you may not even hear binaural beats properly, and if sitting off centre in the room generally, that may have unsettled you if you have motion sickness as the tones try to form a beat in your head. If it was just a standard isochronic tones theta track that shouldn’t be irritating if you have motion sickness.
Cvetkovic D, Simpson D, Cosic I (2006). “Influence of sinusoidally modulated visual stimuli at extremely low frequency range on the human EEG activity“. Conference proceedings : … Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Conference 1: 1311 – 4. doi:10.1109
Similar to how organisms and their genes compete for survival in the environment and gene pool, ideas compete for survival inside brains, and in the pool of ideas that inhabit them. The famous evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins has used this insightful analogy to explain how ideas spread and evolve over time. In his influential 1976 book, "The Selfish Gene," he refers to ideas as “memes” (the mental analog of a gene), which he has defined as self-replicating units that spread throughout culture. We are all familiar with many types of memes, including the various customs, myths, and trends that have become part of human society.

You may already have a good feel for where each of the different brainwave states takes you, and know intuitively what will work for you the best on a day-to-day basis with your meditation practice. If you are a little fuzzy about the differences between the brainwave states, however, and would like to have a really clear, visceral sense of what each state does for you and how they resonate with you physically, mentally, and emotionally, one way you can find out is to listen to Harmonic … [Read more...]
An invigorating, brain-sharpening session, this audio starts at 14Hz, a beta feel-good frequency and SR harmonic. It then steps up in six-minute harmonic increments, gradually up to gamma 39Hz, leaving you feeling mentally stimulated and full of energy. A binaural beat track supports the main frequencies for those wearing headphones. Uplifting background music with embedded amplitude modulation provides a further layer of entrainment. Excellent for use as a morning alarm clock, ahead of a big night out, or to inspire those tired trips to the gym.
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