No list is complete without exercise. Throughout our lives, exercise is critical for helping us maintain healthy bones, a trim figure, and balanced hormones. During menopause, many women gain weight. This is attributed to fluctuating hormones causing food cravings, fatigue causing less activity, and the body not adapting to the hormones and new lifestyle patterns.
With its focus on full, cleansing breaths, deep breathing is a simple yet powerful relaxation technique. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices, too, and can be combined with other relaxing elements such as aromatherapy and music. While apps and audio downloads can guide you through the process, all you really need is a few minutes and a place to stretch out.
This plant, a relative of cabbage and broccoli, is native to Peru and is in the early stages of research that shows it helps fertility and sexual drive. It has historically been used by women to help them healthfully get through menopause. It’s a highly nutritious plant containing healthy carbs and lots of vitamins and minerals. The chief benefit for women going through menopause is it enhances sexual drive. Most women going through menopause find their desire for sex to be at an absolute minimum. It puts a lot of strain on their relationships and can cause mood swings. Maca can help increase your desire for intercourse and make it more comfortable when you have it.
You know how movie characters always look themselves in the restroom mirror when faced with a tough situation? Well, giving yourself a quick pep talk in the looking glass can actually help relieve stress. “‘Mirror work‘ is done by looking in a mirror and vocally speaking positive affirmations to yourself with affectionate conviction, to release worry or to improve your self-confidence,” Whitaker says. To relieve stress in the moment, she suggests using a restroom mirror, your car’s rear-view mirror, or even a compact. “Calm your mind by saying encouraging affirmations aloud to yourself, such as, ‘I am excellent at what I do,’ ‘I’ve got this! I am amazing,’ ‘I am an asset to this company,’ or ‘I am awesome!’” she says.

The aim of this study is to identify tendencies in the effectiveness of relaxing audio stimuli that could be verified through further focused experiments. A series of brainwave entrainment (BWE) techniques for inducing relaxation will be presented consisting of different binaural phenomena (BP). The BP will derive from the binaural sine wave beat, widely acknowledged in rhythmic BWE literature. ... [Show full abstract]View full-text
Literally embrace whatever it is you're going through and then let it go. Try doing a tai chi exercise known as "embracing the tiger," where you take your arms, spread them wide, put your hands together and then draw them—and everything around you—toward your navel, the center of your being. Doing this allows you to take the good with the bad. Then reverse your hands and push them out, releasing your tension. When you can control stress, it can no longer control you. (Follow it with this progressive muscle relaxation technique to reduce stress.)

Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology – CIM14. Berlin, Germany 2014 first group it increases, and for the second decreases. Experimental group did not fall asleep but maintained a relaxation state after the stimulus, while control group achieved unconscious relaxation but the effects did not hold. The STAI “State” indicated that stress increased after the stimulus for control group (see graph A1.2). 14. CONCLUSIONS • Delta (20-200) and theta (20-100) brainwaves are the ones that have greater amplitude (microvolts) in both groups. Results are clearly shown in graphs A1.5 and A1.10. Graph A1.5 Theta Graph A1.10 Delta • Higher frequency EEG waves such as beta waves have less amplitude. This happens because they are not synchronized and have more phase differences in both groups. • An increased alpha parameter is higher in the experimental group, which indicates that they achieved conscious relaxation. In contrast, the control group showed higher delta waves and presented signs of deep sleep during the experiment. Control group also possibly reached REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep halfway throughout the stimulus due theta waves presence in the EEG. • Beta waves are higher in the control group from s = 507 to s = 624 because of unexpected sounds in the stimulus (traffic noise appeared in the original recording). • Both stimuli induced relaxation, but it is important to point out that a person can relax without falling asleep. In this way the binaural stimulus worked better. • It is likely that the control group fell asleep with the nature sounds stimuli because lack of stimulation. • Contrary to what we expected, theta binaural waves didn’t induced FFR in experimental group, although they helped to achieve conscious relaxation. • Delta waves were higher in the experimental group during post-experiment measurements. This suggests that relaxation states were maintained with the absence of stimulus. • Presence of Alpha waves was reduced during deep sleep. This evidence is supported by the control group’s Delta values. • In the absence of stimuli, Delta wave values of the control group decreased, which means that relaxation effects did not prevail. • The effectiveness of an anxiolytic may be measured through the relaxation degree during stimulus and whether its effect endured or not. • For further evaluation of coherence [17] between brainwaves in both hemispheres and the ERP, the use of a 10-20 EEG system is recommended. • Post-experimental STAI “State” tests results are lower in the experimental group. This means that Theta binaural waves were a better anxiolytic than the stimuli (nature sounds) used in the control group. REFERENCES [1] Huang, T., & Charyton, C. (2008). A Comprehensive Review of The Psychological Effects of Brainwave Entrainment. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 14(5). [2] Berger H. (1929) Über Das Elektrenkephalogramm Des Menschen. Arch Psychiatrie Nervenkrankheiten. [3] Chatrian GE, Petersen MC, Lazarte JA. (1960) Responses to clicks from the human brain: some depth electrographic observations. Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol.. [4] Ulam, Frederick A. (1991) An Investigation of the effects of binaural beat frequencies on human brain waves. California School Of Professional Psychology. [5] Notimex. (2013, July 02). México, país con más estrés laboral. El Universal. Retrieved from: http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/ciencia/2013/mexico-pais-mas-estres-laboral-78744.html [6] American Psychological Association (n.d.). Stress: The different kinds of stress. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/stress-kinds.aspx [7] R. Padmanabhan, A. J. Hildreth and D. Laws. (2005) A prospective, randomised, experimentalled study examining binaural beat audio and pre-operative anxiety in patients undergoing general anaesthesia for day case surgery. Anaesthesia. 60, 769-773. [8] Loy, Gareth. (2006) Musimathics. London, England: MIT Press. [9] Atwater, F. Holmes. (2009) Frequency Following Response Study. The Monroe Institute. [10] Ferraro, Fernando M., Acuña, Marcelo. (n.d.) Formación Reticular y Fibras de Asociación del Experimental Encefálico. Departamento de anatomia facultad de medicina, UBA. [11]Le Scouarnec, R. P., Poirier, R. M. Owens, J. E., Gauthier, J., Taylor, A. G. and Foresman, P. A. (2001) Use of Binaural beat tapes for treatment on anxiety: a pilot study of tape preference and outcomes. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. [12] Díaz, M. A., & Comeche, M. I. (2004). Beneficios de la relajación. Retrived from: http://www.psicologiadelasalud.es/beneficios_de_la_relajacion.html [13] Gómez García, J. (2003). Efectos de la música trance percusiva y la música trance electrónica en el EEG. Tesis Licenciatura. Psicología. Departamento de Psicología, Escuela de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de las Américas Puebla. Retrieved from:
This paper describes an arts-science collaborative project titled Standing Waves, which creatively entwines data drawn from the rhythms of the body in sleep/wake cycles with sensor-based technology for synaesthetic performance. The project partners situate their practice and research in the fields of choreography/dance, sleep science and media art and design. Our work explores how the ... [Show full abstract]View full-text
I have had your Equisync CD’s for a little more than 2 years. Some recent stresses prompted me to start listening to them again. Wow……these cd’s are no joke. I have been playing them consistently for the past 2 weeks and they are a tremendous help. I have to ask about the Equisync III cds. Can this elicit a detox reaction? I played it in its entirety one night and the next morning I felt like I was having a healing crisis. I am not complaining 🙂 I believe these particular cds allows tremendous amounts of healing light to enter the body through the higher chakras.
As soon as this session begins, the 10Hz frequency kicks in, helping to release your worries, brighten your mood, and encourage the release of the happy hormone, serotonin. This is followed by progressive patterns of euphoria-inducing beta frequencies, each building on the last, helping you to get you energized and feeling great. The uplifting background also gives this session an added kick. An excellent way to start the day – but don’t use it too late, as it may disrupt your sleep patterns.
It was a few months after the birth of our second child that I came to truly understand the effects of long-term sleep deprivation. Constantly waking up at 1:00 or 3:00 a.m. soon turned daily life into a hazy blur. I'd often find myself lying in bed, anticipating the next round of crying, or later in the night, I'd be tossing and turning for ages after being woken up. It's no fun whatsoever to drag yourself out of bed every morning with dark circles under your eyes. During this time, it became … [Read more...]
Under the hands of the skilled massage therapist, massage can balance your hormones and reduce your stress. Many studies show massage therapy can reduce pain, reduce heart disease, reduce blood pressure, quiet the mind, and help repair muscular and tissue damage. During menopause, massage can help balance your hormones, reduce stress, and give you a little bit of alone-time to get your mind back under your control.
In addition to understanding how exercise can help manage stress and the types of exercise to recommend for stress management, it is important to understand common barriers that might affect exercise participation in high-stress clients. Lack of time is the most commonly reported exercise barrier for individuals in general. A lack of motivation, fatigue, poor sleep habits, and poor dietary habits are factors associated with stress that can negatively impact exercise compliance and adherence (4). Common exercise barriers and stress-related health problems should be taken into consideration when developing an exercise prescription for high-stress individuals.

This session uses a proven technique for inducing deep relaxation, playing one frequency for two minutes, then alternating to a second after a 30-second ramp, then reversing the process. The first half of the session switches between a serotonin-boosting 10Hz and the grounding and rejuvenating 7.83Hz Schumann resonance. The second half of the session goes even deeper, alternating between the relaxing 7.83Hz and 6.3Hz, a frequency associated with releasing anger and irritability. The session ends on a chilled out 10Hz.

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